Knowledgebase-Development of a Proposed Sewer System for Estill Springs


Information Product

Title:Development of a Proposed Sewer System for Estill Springs
Summary:Recommendation that Estill Springs connect with a neighboring town's sewer system.
Original Author:Rollins, Sharon
Co-Author:
Product Create Date:08/06/2001
Last Reviewed on::01/10/2017
Subject:Sewers; Utilities--Administration; Utilities--Contracts and agreements
Type:Report/Study
Original Document: Estill Springs sewer.pdf

Reference Documents:

Text of Document: Mayor Barry Tawwater

Estill Springs, Tennessee

Dear Mayor Tawwater:

Don Darden, MTAS Management Consultant met with you recently to discuss considerations for developing a proposed sewer system to serve the town. I understand that a sewer system is needed to foster commercial growth in Estill Springs. Building a new sewer system is usually the biggest project any community ever undertakes. It will be administratively and financially challenging especially in the first few years. Having centralized sewer service will change the community. Growth will occur if centralized sewer service is available. For those reasons, it is essential to have community buy-in. Sewer systems are not financially profitable. They provide a needed service, improve quality of life and usually increase property values.

I recommend connection with a neighboring town’s sewer system if at all possible. I understand from Mr. Darden that the City of Winchester’s sewer system is nearby and that Winchester is considering a plant upgrade. Mr. Darden advised you to explore the possibility of connecting to Winchester, and I concur. The advantages of this arrangement are: Estill Springs would not have the liability of a sewer system discharge permit; would not have to operate and maintain a sewage treatment plant; and the life cycle cost of obtaining sewer service will likely be less expensive than if the town built its own plant. Estill Springs would still be responsible for construction, operation and maintenance of its collection system. A disadvantage is that your town would be dependent on another town for sewage capacity and treatment. But, concerns on both sides could be handled with a comprehensive contract agreement. When you get to that point, MTAS would be glad to provide assistance.

Either Mr. Darden or I would be glad to meet with you to work through issues as you embark on obtaining sewer service for the town. Please let us know how MTAS may help.

Sincerely,

Sharon Rollins, P.E.

Manager of Technical Consultants