Knowledgebase-Public Property Naming


Information Product

Title:Public Property Naming
Summary:Eight cities were asked several questions regarding the naming of public property.
Original Author:McMillen, Dawn
Co-Author:
Product Create Date:09/30/2016
Last Reviewed on::01/11/2017
Subject:Public facilities--Naming
Type:Survey
Original Document: Maryville Naming Public Property Results.pdfMaryville Naming Public Property Results.pdf

Reference Documents:

Text of Document:
MTAS Research and Information Center

Public Property Naming | September 2016
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Franklin
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    No.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    No
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    The parks department doesn’t have a naming right policy. The park names were decided and voted on by the Mayor and Aldermen. Public buildings are named by their function and the addressing manual doesn’t allow streets to be named after people.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donation are given secondary consideration, and so on?
    N/A
    5) Does your city do active fundraising which allows donors to be recognized on public property? For instance, allowing the purchase of a brick in a new sidewalk or a park bench with a name displayed?
    No.
    6) If someone asks to be able to make a donation to have something named, is there a minimum donation that they must meet to be considered? N/A
    7) Would you describe your method or criteria that are used to prioritize all requests?
    The Parks Department has made an effort to avoid naming a facility after someone. The city addressing manual doesn’t allow for streets to be named after people. Public buildings are named by their function.

Johnson City
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    Yes. MTAS has a copy.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    Yes. Johnson City Board of Commissioners
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    Have policy.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration and so on?
    No.
    5) Does your city do active fundraising which allows donors to be recognized on public property? For instance, allowing the purchase of a brick in a new sidewalk or a park bench with a name displayed?
    No.
    6) If someone asks to be able to make a donation to have something named, is there a minimum donation that they must meet to be considered?
    Yes. Please see pages 5&6 of the Johnson City Naming Policy.
    7) What is the minimum donation that must be met to be considered?
    Differs for each facility.
    8) Would you describe your method or criteria that are used to prioritize all requests? Commissioners may solicit or consider recommendations; a request to rename is filed; Adoption of a formal Resolution by the Board of Commissioners authorizes a name change.

Knoxville
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    Yes. MTAS has a copy.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    Yes. City of Knoxville Public Property Naming Committee
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    Have policy.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration and so on?
    Yes. From the website, “Consideration is also given to the historical, geographical and social/cultural context of the requests.”
    5) Does your city do active fundraising which allows donors to be recognized on public property? For instance, allowing the purchase of a brick in a new sidewalk or a park bench with a name displayed?
    No.
    6) If someone asks to be able to make a donation to have something named, is there a minimum donation that they must meet to be considered? No.
    7) What is the minimum donation that must be met to be considered?
    N/A.
    8) Would you describe your method or criteria that are used to prioritize all requests?
    Forms must be filled out and fee mailed to the City Recorder’s Office. A date and time for the committee to consider the request will be chosen and those involved will be contacted. Approved requests are sent to the Mayor for review. The Mayor then provides a written recommendation and this, along with the request are sent to City Council for their consideration.
    The committee cannot be involved with naming of new streets. That is left up to the City of Knoxville Uniform Street Naming and Addressing Ordinance and the Knoxville-Knox County Subdivision Regulations.
    The committee is allowed to develop and create operating procedures which include: specific criteria for proposing and evaluating applications for name changes, creating the forms and fees to be charged for the applications.
    Please see ordinance for more information.

Memphis
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    Yes. MTAS has a copy.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    For street names, a resolution is passed by City Council. For schools, companies and individuals can make donations for naming rights to the facilities.
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    Have policy.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration and so on?
    No. Any citizen can file for a street name change, there is no prioritization. The goal is to cause the least amount of impact possible. Memphis also offers an Honorary Street Name option: a black plaque with gold lettering is placed on the street but doesn’t change the street name.
    5) Does your city do active fundraising which allows donors to be recognized on public property? For instance, allowing the purchase of a brick in a new sidewalk or a park bench with a name displayed?
    Shelby County Schools are only starting the process for naming rights.
    6) What policies/procedures do you have in place involving that program?
    N/A
    ** Spoke with the Planner from Shelby County to obtain information

Murfreesboro
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    No.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    No.
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    The Mayor receives the requests and may make recommendations to City Council for consideration and approval.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration, and so on?
    No.
    5) Does your city do active fundraising which allows donors to be recognized on public property? For instance, allowing the purchase of a brick in a new sidewalk or a park bench with a name displayed?
    No.

Nashville
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    Yes. MTAS has a copy.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    City Council.
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    Have policy.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration, and so on?
    No.
    5) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration, and so on?
    No honorary street names are given to living persons.
    6) Would you describe your method or criteria that are used to prioritize all requests?
    Honorary street names are not identified on official maps.

Oak Ridge
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    Yes. MTAS has a copy.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    City Council.
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    Have policy.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration, and so on?
    Yes.
    5) Comments on question 4:
    “The person or persons being honored must have made a significant and substantial contribution to the City of Oak Ridge as a whole, or to a greater area that resulted in national or international renown.”
    6) Does your city do active fundraising which allows donors to be recognized on public property? For instance, allowing the purchase of a brick in a new sidewalk or a park bench with a name displayed?
    No.
    7) Would you describe your method or criteria that are used to prioritize all requests?
    See pages 2-3 of Oak Ridge Naming Policy for detailed procedure.

Savannah
    1) Does your city have a policy (or policies) regarding the naming of public property?
    No.
    2) Do you have a committee to consider and either approve or decline (or make recommendations) such requests?
    No.
    3) If you don’t have a standing policy, could you describe your procedure for handling such requests?
    City Manager can accept, request and inquire whether the elected governing body wishes to act upon the request. If the elected governing body wishes to act affirmatively on the request, they may do so via resolution or ordinance.
    4) Do you prioritize naming or memorialization requests based on certain criteria? For example, those that are related to historical events or persons are given first consideration, monetary donations are given secondary consideration, and so on?
    No.
    5) Does your city do active fundraising which allows donors to be recognized on public property? For instance, allowing the purchase of a brick in a new sidewalk or a park bench with a name displayed?
    No.
    6) If someone asks to be able to make a donation to have something named, is there a minimum donation that they must meet to be considered? Other
    7) What is the minimum donation that must be met to be considered?
    Donation of property to be used publicly may have naming rights.